10Dec2018

Applying results-based finance to the Paris Agreement

Results-based finance is a mechanism that enables an “off-taker” to pay a “project developer” for the delivery of specific results. For a results-based payment mechanism to work, four key elements are required

Blog:A race against time
Authors: Gareth Phillips

Categories: Gareth Phillips


26Nov2018

Engaging private sector in financing local climate adaptation: What lessons can we learn from Africa and how to scale them up?

“I nearly lost everything this year, when my rice farm almost collapsed during an unprecedented drought.” Mrs. Sacca has been farming rice for the past seven years on her two one-hectare plots of lowland near N’Dali, north-east of Benin. The rice she grows is the main source of subsistence for her family. On a good year, she can generate enough revenue from her rice sales to pay her children’s school fees and to keep her family clothed, fed and housed. “It was a close call! The rains were late on one of my two rice furrows, which are 5km apart. With the help of two young people from the village, we had to hastily dig a bore hole and water the young shoots that were already drying up, while waiting for the rains to arrive”.

Blog:A race against time
Comments:

1 comment(s)


07Sep2018

Africa’s commitment to integrating gender in climate change adaptation polices and initiatives matters

Actors across Africa can show their commitment to ending gender inequality by reconsidering climate change policy and initiatives.

Blog:A race against time

07Sep2018

Climate change interventions in Africa: applying a gender lens

A common image of Africa is that of women and girls walking long distances carrying heavy loads of water and fuelwood. Climate Change is forcing women and girls to walk ever longer distances due to water and fuel scarcity – endangering their health and safety – and restricting their educational and income generating opportunities.

Blog:A race against time

07Jun2018

How can waste management drive green growth?

In Africa, solid waste management is a major developmental challenge with serious consequences for environmental quality, public health, fisheries, agriculture, and sustainable development. Today, most African countries lack the resources, infrastructures, skills and expertise necessary to tackle the amount and complexity of solid waste being produced. Currently, 19 out of the world’s 50 biggest dumpsites are located in Africa. High population growth, urbanization rates, and new consumption pathways will exacerbate waste production, which is projected to exceed 160 million tons by 2025.

Blog:A race against time
Comments:

13 comment(s)


Search filters

Subscribe

You are currently offline. Some pages or content may fail to load.