West Africa is at the heart of Africa’s transformation. With a projected growth rate of 7.4 per cent in 2014, it is the fastest growing region in the continent. As many of its countries undergo a strong stabilization, emerge from conflict, or even rise to middle income status, the region begins to reap the fruits of its regional and global integration. A global demand for expert opinions and analysis is rising rapidly. Read More

11Sep2014

Ebola epidemic may reverse decades of socio-economic progress in Sierra Leone

Following a remarkable post-conflict recovery in the early 2000s, Sierra Leone was on track to overcome its troubled past, especially after consistent double-digit growth seen over the past five years. The current Ebola epidemic and its overwhelming repercussions on livelihoods, and economic activity is threatening to halt that aspiration and end the positive trajectory of the small West African state.


05Sep2014

Ebola: The need for a gendered approach

Recent media attention has highlighted how Ebola has hit women the hardest and how the epidemic is threatening gains in gender equality made in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. On Aug. 14, the Washington Post reported that across Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, collectively 55 to 60 % of those dead were women.

Authors: Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi - Special Envoy on Gender, AfDB

Categories: Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ebola, Economic & Financial Governance, Health, Gender, Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi


15Aug2014

Beyond the health crisis, Ebola hits Liberia’s economy hard

With over 400 deaths in Liberia and more than 1,000 across West Africa, the Ebola epidemic has been the deadliest in history and has spread fear and panic across the region. But beyond the terrifying health crisis, the Ebola outbreak threatens to reverse much of the economic and social progress Liberia has made over its decade of peace. While GDP growth had averaged over 8% since 2011, it was already forecast to slow down to 5.9% in 2014 due to slower growth in iron ore production, weak timber and rubber exports growth, and the gradual drawdown of the United Nations force (UNMIL). However, restrictions on transportation and commerce, the withdrawal of international workers, a slowdown of investment, and a panicked population will further reduce growth this year. Containing the crisis rapidly will be critical to preserve the progress made, and to reduce risks to the short- and medium-term outlook.


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