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Africa and India - A shared development agenda
03/05/2017 17:08
Africa and India - A shared development agenda

Categories: India, Partnerships

AfDB GEF Partnership - Catalyzing transformational change through green growth in africa
11/01/2016 16:23
AfDB GEF Partnership - Catalyzing transformational change through green growth in africa
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2015
28/09/2015 12:26
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2015
The African Development Bank and the Global Environment Facility - 2014 Annual Report
04/05/2015 10:58
The African Development Bank and the Global Environment Facility - 2014 Annual Report
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2014
01/11/2014 15:31
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2014
Nigeria - 2013 - Country Profile - Leveraging Partnerships for Economic Transformation and Inclusive Growth
14/05/2014 11:26
Nigeria - 2013 - Country Profile - Leveraging Partnerships for Economic Transformation and Inclusive Growth
Rwanda - 2014 - Country Profile - Improving economic competitiveness to bring about shared growth - Full Report
14/05/2014 09:40
Rwanda - 2014 - Country Profile - Improving economic competitiveness to bring about shared growth - Full Report
Rwanda - 2014 - Country Profile - Improving economic competitiveness to bring about shared growth - Summary Report
14/05/2014 09:40
Rwanda - 2014 - Country Profile - Improving economic competitiveness to bring about shared growth - Summary Report
Economic Brief - Guided by the North Stars - The Swedish Model of Regional Development as a Source of Inspiration for Tunisia
20/02/2014 14:34
Economic Brief - Guided by the North Stars - The Swedish Model of Regional Development as a Source of Inspiration for Tunisia
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2013 - Full Report
25/06/2013 10:28
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report 2013 - Full Report
Ethiopia - 2013 - Country Profile - Partnering for Inclusive Growth
25/06/2013 09:48
Ethiopia - 2013 - Country Profile - Partnering for Inclusive Growth
China and Africa: an Emerging Partnership for Development?
06/10/2011 09:41
China and Africa: an Emerging Partnership for Development?

Categories: China, Partnerships

Africa Economic Brief  - The Korea-Africa Partnership: Beyond Trade and Investment
15/07/2011 16:55
Africa Economic Brief - The Korea-Africa Partnership: Beyond Trade and Investment

Categories: Korea, Partnerships

Working Paper 125 - China and Africa: An Emerging Partnership for Development? - An Overview of Issues
23/06/2011 08:20
Working Paper 125 - China and Africa: An Emerging Partnership for Development? - An Overview of Issues
China’s phenomenal growth offers an opportunity to boost Africa’s development.&nbsp; China’s loans and concessional assistance have financed a wide range of development projects on the continent. China also is reaping significant benefits from this relationship, through access to raw materials, expanded markets for exports of manufactures, and the establishment of investment relationships. But leadership from African governments, particularly to strengthen domestic policies and governance and to harmonize regional policies so as to improve the continent’s bargaining position with China, is required to ensure that the China-Africa relationship contributes to sustainable growth and poverty reduction.&nbsp; The twin goals of this paper are to summarize the analysis on the economic exchange between China and Africa, and to outline policy recommendations to improve the benefits to both parties. China is a valuable trading partner, a source of investment financing, and an important complement to traditional development partners. China is investing massively in infrastructure, which helps alleviate supply bottlenecks and improves competitiveness. For China, Africa is not only a source of critical capital inputs necessary to expand its domestic economy, but also a future investment destination for labor intensive manufacturing, especially given that wages are rising much faster in China than in African. The following recommendations for African countries, China and the African Development Bank Group are intended to improve the mutual gains from African-Chinese cooperation. <b>African Countries should: </b> <ul><li>Improve coordination between aid and investments from China and from traditional development partners. </li><li>Enhance technology transfer and maximize the positive spillover effects from foreign investment through local labor and content requirements, as is already done in several African countries. </li><li>Achieve greater export diversification by identifying niche markets for African manufacturing products in China, and by expanding preferential trade access to Chinese markets. </li><li>Build backward and forward linkages between the domestic economy and the Special Economic Zones supported by Chinese investment.</li></ul> <b>China should:</b> <ul><li>Prioritize the development challenges of Africa within the established FOCAC framework, including addressing issues such as food insecurity, climate change and adaptation technology and infrastructure. </li><li>Support additional investment in Africa in labor intensive manufacturing industries. Currently, as wages are rising in China, labor intensive manufacturing is “relocating” to other Asian countries such as Cambodia and Vietnam.</li></ul> <b>The African Development Bank Group should:</b> <ul><li>Leverage the Bank Group’s expertise and operational experience in key areas identified in the FOCAC, namely, food security, climate change and adaptation technology, African integration and infrastructure.</li></ul>Read more

Categories: China, Partnerships

Working Paper 129 - China’s Engagement and Aid Effectiveness in Africa
23/06/2011 00:00
Working Paper 129 - China’s Engagement and Aid Effectiveness in Africa
This paper has considers the impact of China’s engagement in Africa for African economic development. Due to a lack of good information, we have attempted to analyze this engagement using indirect methods. Chinese aid, finance, trade and investment flows to Africa are growing fast. We consider the consequences of these trends using a quantified framework. Very often, adequate data are simply non-available, but we find that existing data provide useful insights on what is going on. Our findings suggest that the core of the Chinese financial engagement in Africa is either in countries with which it has good political relations, notably its “all weather friends” such as Egypt, Ethiopia, Mali and Tanzania, or in countries that represent strategic interests for the Chinese economy due to their oil and mineral resources, such as Algeria, Angola, Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Sudan and Zambia. Thus China, like other bilateral donors, does pursue its own economic interests in its engagement with Africa. However, in recent years China’s engagement with Africa has expanded to cover most countries on the continent and beyond natural resources to light manufacturing and services. Clear examples are China’s projects in Mauritius and Botswana. China is also significantly involved in some countries that are “aid darlings” of the international donor community, such as Ghana. Moreover, China’s development assistance policy has had, from its very beginning, an orientation towards poverty reduction, with significant cooperation and technical assistance in the health sector and agriculture. In recent years, we observe also, insofar as data permit, some influence of poverty on Chinese geographical aid allocation. Recently, China’s financial engagement in Africa has supported sectors that are under-financed by the international donor community, notably infrastructure. This is an area in which there is room for cooperation between China and multilateral financial institutions such as the World Bank and the African Development Bank, although so far such cooperation has been limited. <br />This engagement can be helpful in assisting African economies through the current global financial crisis. Since the end of 2008, Chinese leaders have repeated that the crisis will not affect their assistance to Africa. Keeping this commitment would help Africa mitigate the adverse consequences of the global financial crisis, and will be a good test of China’s desire to maintain its support for African development. Engagement with Africa can also help support China’s growth through the current economic environment. As China’s financial sector is insulated from international financial markets, the main impact of the financial crisis on China has come through reduced demand for its exports&nbsp; (for example, China’s exports fell by 25.7% in February 2009 below the February 2008 level). While Africa receives only a small share of China’s exports, nevertheless continued growth in Africa will contribute to the recovery of China’s exports.&nbsp; And lending to resource-rich African countries in RMB may not turn out to be a poor investment, particularly if the RMB continues its appreciation against the dollar.Read more
Partnership and Cooperation Opportunities
06/03/2009 00:00
Partnership and Cooperation Opportunities

Categories: Partnerships

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