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Regional Economic Outlook 2019 - West Africa
03/04/2019 17:16
Regional Economic Outlook 2019 - West Africa
West Africa Economic Outlook 2018
12/03/2018 14:00
West Africa Economic Outlook 2018
The West Africa Economic Outlook presents a comprehensive economic analysis of the 16countries in this region, focusing on growth, macroeconomic stability and employment, structural change, and poverty reduction. It provides estimates for 2017 and projections for 2018 and 2019. A second part of the outlook examines the labor market in more detail. Average GDP growth in West Africa stalled in 2016, after several strong years, to 0.5 percent. It rebounded in 2017 to 2.5 percent, and was projected to rise to 3.8 percent in 2018 and 3.9 percent in 2019. Countries’ performance varied, but because Nigeria contributes about 70 percent of regional GDP, its patterns largely shape regional ones. The service sector’s share in the economy is the largest in most countries, and manufacturing’s share is the smallest in all of them. Demand in the economies comes primarily—70 percent on average—from private consumption, but gross capital formation is expected to be the fastest growing area of demand in the next couple of years. To reduce vulnerability to external shocks threatened by the dependence of several economies, especially Nigeria, on oil or other mineral extraction, West Africa must increase domestic input into its products through manufacturing, especially processing minerals and agricultural products.Read more
Working Paper 232 - Remittances and Access to rural credit markets  Evidence from Senegal
12/02/2016 17:58
Working Paper 232 - Remittances and Access to rural credit markets Evidence from Senegal

Categories: Senegal

West Africa Policy Notes - Note 3, Septembre 2015
22/12/2015 12:18
West Africa Policy Notes - Note 3, Septembre 2015
West Africa Monitor Quarterly – Issue 7
10/08/2015 10:15
West Africa Monitor Quarterly – Issue 7
West Africa Monitor Quarterly – Issue 6
30/04/2015 15:35
West Africa Monitor Quarterly – Issue 6
Working Paper - 218 - Household Energy Demand and the Impact of Energy Prices: Evidence from Senegal
21/01/2015 17:43
Working Paper - 218 - Household Energy Demand and the Impact of Energy Prices: Evidence from Senegal

Categories: Senegal, Energy & Power

West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 4
21/11/2014 17:11
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 4
Working Paper - 207 - Améliorer la Compétitivité en Afrique par le Développement des Infrastructures - Sénégal
10/09/2014 23:40
Working Paper - 207 - Améliorer la Compétitivité en Afrique par le Développement des Infrastructures - Sénégal
Working Paper - 208 - The Main Obstacles to Firms Growth in Senegal Implications for the Long-Run
10/09/2014 23:38
Working Paper - 208 - The Main Obstacles to Firms Growth in Senegal Implications for the Long-Run
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 3
21/08/2014 13:22
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 3
West Africa Policy Note - Note 01, July 2014
11/07/2014 09:40
West Africa Policy Note - Note 01, July 2014
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 2
14/05/2014 13:23
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 2
Working Paper 191 - Do Firms Learn by Exporting or Learn to Export: Evidence from Senegalese Manufacturers’ Plants
23/12/2013 16:09
Working Paper 191 - Do Firms Learn by Exporting or Learn to Export: Evidence from Senegalese Manufacturers’ Plants
This paper investigates the link between exports / trade openness and firms’ performance in the Senegalese manufacture sector, using a rich and unique firm-level panel data spanning the period 1998-2011. The data has been obtained from the Single Information Collecting Centre (CUCI). The paper started with the assumption that, in the Learning by exporting (LBE) mechanism, firms improve their productivity after entering a foreign market (Clerides et al., 1998). Therefore, exporting results in productivity gains. The study implicitly takes into account the conclusions of a recent growth diagnosis undertaken by the ADB (2012) about the main obstacles to firms’ growth. These main obstacles are access to electricity and poor education. The framework used is a simultaneous functions model based on Bigsten and al. (2002), controlling for other unobserved effects and the properties of the time series. The observation level is the firm. The approach involves jointly estimation of a dynamic productivity function and a dynamic discrete choice model for the decision to export, where it is allowed for causality running both from efficiency to exporting and from exporting to efficiency. This strategy enables to control for unobserved heterogeneity in the form of firm specific effects that are correlated across the two equations. The estimation follows two steps: the TFP calculation and the self-selection and learning-by-exporting test controlling for unobserved effects. The findings suggest that workers’ qualification and access to Patents and Licences have a positive effect on the process of learning. For instance, skills improve productivity by 41 percent in the self-selection case and by 28% in the learning-by-export setting. Also, small firms particularly learn more from exporting. From a policy perspective, this evidence of learning-by-exporting suggests that Senegal has much to gain from promoting its manufacturing sector towards exporting by supporting domestic firms to overcome the barriers to enter into foreign market, particularly by investing on skilled workers and promote access to Patents and Licences as well as disseminating benefits arising from exporting to non exporters. The results also indicate the evidences of both self-selections of the most efficient firms enter into the export market and effect of Learning in the export market. From a policy perspective, the learning-by-exporting finding suggests that Senegal has much to gain from promoting its manufacturing sector towards exporting by increasing the ability of domestic firms to overcome foreign market barriers as well as assimilate further benefits arising from exporting. Given the importance of the skills of workers in the process of acquisition of productivity gains on the external market, special attention should be accorded to the training of the workforce. Hence, the State could help developing curricula into colleagues and senior secondary schools or other training programs enable companies to have the skills they need. Special public strategies to promote firms’ access to Patents and Licences and Innovation must be implemented. Finally, supports favour to small and medium enterprises programs could strengthen their productivity gains on the external market. The initiatives already undertaken favour to the small plants might be continued and reinforced.Read more
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 1
10/10/2013 15:27
West Africa Monitor Quarterly - Issue 1
The West Africa Monitor aims at monitoring key socio‐economic developments in the region and provides brief analysis on latest events across the countries. This issue includes (i) a Regional Overview highlighting major trends; (i) a set of country notes each of them featuring a special theme of key relevance for the country at the time of writing; and (iii) a dedicated section on financial sector in West Africa.Read more
Sénégal - 2013 - Profil pays - Un aperçu des interventions du Groupe de la BAD
18/09/2013 13:37
Sénégal - 2013 - Profil pays - Un aperçu des interventions du Groupe de la BAD
Development Research Briefs - Lengthening Financial Contracts, an Issue in the West Africa Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) Region
30/06/2010 08:07
Development Research Briefs - Lengthening Financial Contracts, an Issue in the West Africa Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) Region
Senegal - 2008 - Country Profile
27/04/2009 15:05
Senegal - 2008 - Country Profile

Categories: Senegal

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