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Review of the land tenure systems - Report on Tanzania
22/05/2019 15:13
Review of the land tenure systems - Report on Tanzania
Regional Economic Outlook 2019 - East Africa
04/04/2019 18:35
Regional Economic Outlook 2019 - East Africa
East Africa Economic Outlook 2018
12/03/2018 13:36
East Africa Economic Outlook 2018
The <em>East Africa Economic Outlook </em>reviews economic performance in 2017 and forecasts the next two years by highlighting the region’s key drivers of growth, opportunities, and challenges. It covers major macroeconomic developments in the region’s 13 countries and discusses structural issues affecting future growth, poverty, and inequality. It also presents in part II a synopsis of manufacturing activity in the region, drawing on a previous study of seven of the region’s countries. The outlook selects manufacturing as the sector to cover due to its potential to drive future growth and employment in the subregion. Economic growth in East Africa was a robust 5.9 percent in 2017 and is forecast to persist in 2018 and 2019. It would have been even higher, had it not been for political instability in the region’s fragile states. The service sector is generally the main driver of East Africa’s growth as agriculture, which has for a longtime played a leading role, is receding. Services grew 12.4 percent in 2017, compared with 12.0 percent for industry and 7.1 percent for agriculture. The mineral and industrial sectors’ role in driving growth is also increasing. On the demand side, household consumption is the main driver of growth, followed by public investment in infrastructure, mineral exploration, and construction.Read more
Tanzania - Country results  brief 2017
30/11/2017 11:26
Tanzania - Country results brief 2017
<p>The African Development Bank is stepping up the pace in Tanzania by focusing on the “High 5s” — five priorities that are crucial for accelerating Africa’s economic transformation: Light up and Power Africa, Feed Africa, Industrialise Africa, Integrate Africa, and Improve the Quality of Life for the People of Africa.</p> <p>This Tanzania Country Results Brief demonstrates the Bank’s recent progress in moving the country toward its goal of reaching middle-income status by 2025. It also highlights the Bank’s responsiveness to Tanzania’s needs, in moving closer to the field and providing the best value for money. Today the Bank has a Tanzania portfolio of 21 operations valued at $1.8 billion, which builds on the record of development results it has achieved in Tanzania since 2006.</p> <p>Light up and power Africa — About 70% of Tanzanians still live without electricity, and demand for energy is rising rapidly. Through the New Deal on Energy for Africa, the AfDB is working to unify efforts to achieve universal access to energy. The Bank has constructed 630 km of transmission and distribution lines.</p> <p>Feed Africa — 40% of Tanzanians live in food insecurity, while the country has vast arable lands. If the full potential of this land were unlocked, agriculture could vastly improve the lives of millions. The Bank has improved the lives of 4 million Tanzanians through improvements in agriculture.</p> <p>Industrialise Africa — A persistent lack of industrialisation is holding back Tanzania’s economy. Only a quarter of the population has access to finance. The Bank has supported financial institutions that granted 155 000 microcredits and investee projects that benefited 455 000 people.</p> <p>Integrate Africa — Through its Regional Integration Policy and Strategy, the Bank is focusing its integration efforts not just on movement of goods and services, but also on mobility of people and investments. It delivered 12 660 km of roads in Tanzania, facilitating trade and mobility.</p> <p>Improve the quality of life for the people of Africa — Tanzania’s economic growth has not been rapid or inclusive enough to create enough jobs and improve the quality of life. The Bank is committed to building up the availability of technical skills so that the Tanzanian economy can realise its full potential in high-technology sectors. The Bank provided vocational training to 3860 people and provided 1 million people with access to education.</p> <p>The Bank is committed to accelerating the pace of project delivery in Tanzania, with high-quality and gender-sensitive operations that bring about lasting changes in the lives of Tanzanians.</p>Read more
Working Paper 240 - The Impact of the Real Exchange Rate Changes on Export Performance in Tanzania and Ethiopia
30/08/2016 11:11
Working Paper 240 - The Impact of the Real Exchange Rate Changes on Export Performance in Tanzania and Ethiopia

Categories: Ethiopia, Tanzania

Working Paper 233 - Technology Adoption and Risk Exposure among Smallholder Farmers: Panel Data Evidence from Tanzania and Uganda
18/04/2016 17:02
Working Paper 233 - Technology Adoption and Risk Exposure among Smallholder Farmers: Panel Data Evidence from Tanzania and Uganda

Categories: Tanzania, Uganda

Regional Integration Brief - Tanzania’s seaports and transport corridors as development opportunity for east and southern Africa
18/12/2015 17:20
Regional Integration Brief - Tanzania’s seaports and transport corridors as development opportunity for east and southern Africa
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2014
24/04/2015 14:21
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2014
AfDB Partner of Choice for East Africa - EARC Report 2014
08/10/2014 12:27
AfDB Partner of Choice for East Africa - EARC Report 2014
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2014
02/10/2014 12:01
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2014
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - First Quarter 2014
09/06/2014 13:38
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - First Quarter 2014
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2013
02/04/2014 10:09
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2013
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Third Quarter 2013
22/11/2013 10:18
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Third Quarter 2013
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2013
28/08/2013 12:44
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2013
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - First Quarter 2013
06/06/2013 13:17
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - First Quarter 2013
Economic Brief - State of Infrastructure in East Africa
23/04/2013 14:28
Economic Brief - State of Infrastructure in East Africa
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2012
04/04/2013 15:41
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Fourth Quarter 2012
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Third Quarter 2012
04/04/2013 15:36
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Third Quarter 2012
Working Paper 163 - Food Prices and Inflation in Tanzania
26/12/2012 18:53
Working Paper 163 - Food Prices and Inflation in Tanzania
This paper presents an econometric model of headline Tanzanian inflation and its principal components for the period since 2000.&nbsp; Inflation is modeled in terms of deviations from a set of ‘anchors’ reflecting long-run demand-side and monetary determinants, on the one hand, and supply-side and open economy factors on the other.&nbsp; Five main conclusions derive from our analysis. In the last five years Tanzania, along with the other major economies of East Africa, has experienced a period of high and volatile inflation.&nbsp; In mid-2008, year-on-year headline inflation edged above 10 percent per annum for the first time since the early 1990s, and while it dropped back to low single digits in 2009 it rose again sharply towards the end of 2010, reaching close to 20 percent per annum in the final quarter of 2011. Much of this rise in inflation and inflation volatility reflects developments in the global economy, most obviously the sharp rises in global food and fuels prices in 2008 and again in 2011. With food accounting for 51% of the consumption basket in Tanzania and energy and transport costs accounting for a further 9 percent each, these global developments may be expected to have a powerful impact on overall inflation, both directly and, in the case of energy prices, indirectly through the high share of transport and distribution costs in retail prices. First, money growth and hence the stance of monetary policy matters for inflation both in the long run and in the short run.&nbsp; The transmission from the monetary stance, through aggregate demand, to headline inflation is principally through core inflation but not exclusively so; monetary or demand-side effects also feed food and fuel price inflation, particularly in the short run.&nbsp; Second, however, the principal component of overall inflation -- food price inflation -- is predominantly driven by supply-side factors including both domestic agricultural output shocks and by the pass-through from world prices for food and fuel.&nbsp; The inflation transmission from world food prices is, however, relatively weak and attenuated, and is much stronger when world prices rise than when they fall.&nbsp; This is consistent with an environment in which retailers and distributions enjoy significant market power and are able to pass on price rises to consumers but to cushion their own margins when world prices fall. Third, the effect of domestic supply conditions on food price inflation points to the asymmetric effects of trade policy in Tanzania; while food imports appear to respond reasonably rapidly to domestic production short-falls, the capacity to export surplus food production is much more muted so that market adjustment in this case occurs through falling prices, other things equal.&nbsp; This result has important implications for trade policy and production incentives in agriculture although, as noted below, a much closer analysis of cross-border prices is required before firm policy conclusions can be drawn. Fourth, headline inflation exhibits strong seasonality, consistent with weak price-stabilizing effects of trade and incomplete storage.&nbsp; Non-food inflation is, by contrast, broadly non-seasonal.&nbsp; Finally, prices in Tanzania in general are flexible, more so for the food and energy sub-components but even in the traditionally sticky-price domain of core inflation there is little evidence of inflation persistence overall.&nbsp; Some channels of price adjustment are take time – notably the effects of monetary disequilibrium -- but in general inflationary shocks dissipate rapidly with half-live being little more than one month. The analysis points to three priority areas for further research.&nbsp; First, a better understanding of the supply-side (cost-push) determinants of core inflation is required.&nbsp; Second, and related, the role of movements in the nominal exchange rate remains poorly understood.&nbsp; Once the effects operating through the pass-through from world food and fuel prices – and the role it plays in determining the equilibrium demand for money – there appears to be only a surprisingly weak independent short-run role for the nominal exchange on any of the principal components of inflation.&nbsp; Finally, the concept of ‘world food prices’ used throughout this analysis needs to be revisited to reflect the impact of cross-border food prices, particularly in Kenya to the North and Zambia and Malawi in the South West of the country. At present, our models include measures of the deviation of domestic food and fuel prices from world price indices derived from the World Bank global commodities database.Read more
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2012
18/09/2012 09:05
East Africa Quarterly Bulletin - Second Quarter 2012
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