10 must-read economics stories of the week, 22/09/2017

22sept.2017
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1. Facts and figures. There is a substantial informal economy in many African countries. In fact, the informal sector contributes 50-80 percent of GDP, 60-80 percent of employment, and 90 percent of new jobs. This is holding back economic and human development. (2017 Africa Foresight report / Top Priorities for the Continent in 2017).

2. When media sceptics misrepresent our climate research we must speak out. The 1.5°C Paris goal is perhaps more valid than ever, but reading some of the media coverage you might think the opposite was true. (The Guardian)

3. In the Caribbean, colonialism and inequality mean hurricanes hit harder. Across most Caribbean islands, hazard exposure is about the same, but research shows that poverty and social inequality drastically magnify the severity of disasters. (The Conversation)

4. The relationship between drought and famine: lessons from the Horn of Africa. (The Conversation)

5. S&P Downgrades China’s Debt, Citing a Surge in Lending. The country’s strong economic growth has been fueled by heavy borrowing. (The New York Times)

6. Why Are So Many Young Africans Risking Their Lives to Flee Their Homes? Will the G20’s new ‘Compact with Africa’ succeed in combatting poverty and climate change and deter the exodus of African economic migrants (The Wire)

7. BRICS needs a new approach if it’s going to foster a more equitable global order. Achieving a just and equitable international economic order requires governments to take seriously their commitment to protect and promote human rights as set out in the UN Charter and other human rights treaties. (The Conversation)

8. How low can unemployment go? (The Economist)

9. Learning innovation in the digital age: As the workplace changes, so must education and training. Exciting experiments are under way—but are they enough? (McKinsey)

10. Why family businesses are the natural home of innovators. Keeping their founders’ innovative vision alive helps family businesses to thrive. (Ernst & Young)

Catégories: Jennifer Blanke